Home: Core Subjects: Arts and Literature: LINKS_PAGE

Core Subjects: Arts and Literature: LINKS_PAGE

Articles:

Example and Empathy - William Kilpatrick, Gregory Wolfe, and Suzanne M. Wolfe

How do stories help to encourage character?  Read more...

Fahrenheit 9/11 - James Bowman

As a skeptic about the war in Iraq — and one with a son quite likely to be sent there — I was most disappointed with the quality of the polemic in Fahrenheit 9/11.  Read more...

Fairy Tales and Holy Week - Daniel McInerny

I believe fairy tales, or many of them at any rate, fall into the category of stories that depict golden ages, and thus are dreams of Eden – as well as of that greater Paradise of which Eden itself is but a dream.  Read more...

Faith and Failure in Graham Greene - Edward Short

This was the paradox that Graham Greene carried within himself: He professed the reality of the Faith but chose not to practice it.   Read more...

Faith and Fantasy - Steven Greydanus

The Lord of the Rings film trilogy is an extraordinary cinematic tribute to a great work of Catholic imagination. While not equalling the religious vision of the books, the films honor that vision in a way that Christian viewers can appreciate, and that for non-Christian postmoderns may represent a rare encounter with an unironic vision of good and evil.  Read more...

Farewell to Judgment - Roger Scruton

The sciences aim to explain the world: they build theories that are tested through experiment, and which describe the workings of nature and the deep connections between cause and effect. Nothing like that is true of the humanities.  Read more...

Fatherhood in Virgil's Aeneid - Mitchell Kalpakgian

The Roman hero of Virgil's epic, known originally in the Latin as pius Aeneas ("pious Aeneas"), earns many similar epithets throughout the story.  Read more...

Favorites - JANET SMITH

While I recognize that literature is a high art form and a tremendous source of intellectual, spiritual, and moral enlightenment, I make recourse to literature largely for the purposes of therapy or entertainment. Janet Smith discusses her favorite authors.  Read more...

Fiction as Truth: The Fall and Purification of Pip - R. Kenton Craven

My first most vivid and broad impression of the identity of things, seems to be to have been gained on a memorable raw afternoon towards evening.  Read more...

Film Review: Taking Chance - Ray Nothstine

Lieutenant Colonel Mike Strobl began his 2004 essay “Taking Chance” by saying, “Chance Phelps was wearing his Saint Christopher medal when he was killed on Good Friday.  Read more...

Finding Frodo’s Faith - Joseph Pearce

The Lord of the Rings is every bit as Catholic as its author. It is not only written by a Catholic, it is so Catholic that only a Catholic could have written it.  Read more...

Finding My Way to Orthodoxy - Tod Worner

Orthodoxy.  That was the title of the bent-up, two-toned blue paperback in his hand before me.  Read more...

Fire in Our Darkness - MICHAEL O'BRIEN

Michael O'Brien explores what is necessary for the Christian art of today to be true to its subject. In modern times, the lives of two religious artists, Georges Rouault (1871-1958) and William Kurelek (1927-1977), have left us markers.  Read more...

Five Best Books on Religion and Politics - Mary Ann Glendon

These literary works excel in their depiction of religion and politics.  Read more...

Flannery 0'Connor Banned - J. Bottum

This summer, the racist texts of Flannery O'Connor were banned from the Catholic schools in Lafayette, Louisiana. You hardly know where to begin when faced with a proposition like that. T  Read more...

Flannery O'Connor: Stalking Pride - AMY WELBORN

Flannery O'Connor wrote out of a deep, thoroughly Catholic vision of life, and saw her vocation of writing as essentially telling stories to uncover "mystery through manners, grace through nature."  Read more...

Forward to Books that Build Character - Robert Coles

I recall the first child I had to “transfuse,” a verb I kept hearing all the time — a nine-year-old girl with leukemia who had more than an inkling that she’d never celebrate another birthday…. The girl died a month or so later, but during those few weeks her parents and she read and read, and did a lot of talking about what life means, and the manner in which one ought to live it — an impressive kind of moral scrutiny on their part, under great duress. We are lucky indeed to have such stories as a great heritage, a moral reservoir of sorts, from which we may all constantly draw.   Read more...

Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden - Mitchell Kalpakgian

Something magical occurs when a child who remains indoors goes outside to play.   Read more...

From History to Modernity - Michael S. Rose

The overwrought ornamentation and pompous theatricality of the Rococo churches encouraged the Neo-Classical movement of the late-18th and 19th centuries.  Read more...

G. K. Chesterton: master of rejuvenation - Roger Kimball

In life, there was always something unwieldy about Gilbert Keith Chesterton. Mentally as well as physically, he was a man who tended to . . . overflow.   Read more...

G.K. Chesterton and Malcolm Muggeridge: A balance of opposites - Karl Schmude

Curiously, if I can risk a paradox so early in discussing Chesterton and Muggeridge – for both of them had a love of paradox – it is in the similarities between these two men that we find the differences.   Read more...

G.K. Chesterton: Champion of Orthodoxy - Joseph Pearce

Chesterton's reputation as one of the key figures in Christian literature during the 20th century is linked inextricably with the concept of "orthodoxy."   Read more...

Gatsby's Epitaph: F. Scott Fitzgerald - NATIONAL CATHOLIC REGISTER

The best Catholic novels seem to be written by those who know, no matter how far they've fallen in faith and morals, that the truth is there.  Read more...

George MacDonald (1823-1905) - Léonie Caldecott

C.S. Lewis regarded the Scottish Congregational minister, George MacDonald, as his “master”, and especially a master of the mythopoeic art, of the kind of writing that “gets under our skin, hits us at a level deeper than our thoughts or even our passions, troubles oldest certainties till all questions are reopened, and in general shocks us more fully awake than we are for most of our lives.” MacDonald, says Lewis, converted, even baptized, his Romantic imagination, and prepared him for conversion to Christianity.  Read more...

George Macdonald's The Princess and the Goblin - Mitchell Kalpakgian

The human journey often leads travelers astray who are misled by darkness of the night or by darkness of the intellect.   Read more...


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Pages Updated On: Tue Sep 16 2014 - 21:50:38