Politics and the devil: Living as Catholics in an age of unbelief

HIS GRACE CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M.

God and the devil, are very real and that history is the stage where that struggle is played out, both in our personal choices and in our public actions; where human souls choose their sides and create their futures.

People who commit themselves to prolife work very quickly learn that there really aren't any strangers in this movement. It's held together by a dedication to shared beliefs and sacrifices that cuts across all differences in age or social background or distance. So coming here tonight actually feels a lot like home – and I'm very grateful to Gabby Speach, Kelly Jones, Ray Korson and the rest of Notre Dame's prolife leadership for welcoming me with such outstanding kindness.

By the way, there's another reason this feels a lot like home. My great, great, great grandfather was Pierre Navarre. He was the first white settler here in Saint Joseph County and one of the founders of South Bend. He married Angelique Kechouechouay, a Potawatomi Indian. Father Stephen Badin, a Frenchman and the first priest ordained in the United States, baptized their children. The baptismal records are part of the Notre Dame archives. The Navarre cabin, built by Pierre sometime after 1820, is in Leeper Park, an historical monument. And Pierre himself is buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery here at Notre Dame. So I'm happy to return to the land of my ancestors. And I want to thank the Holy Cross community for their evangelization of the Native people who lived here many years ago.

One of my themes this evening is "politics and the devil." That may sound like an odd way to start a college weekend. The devil does make an appearance in my comments tonight, but I don't plan to suggest that anyone in our national political life has made a pact with Lucifer – although, given the current environment, you never know. It's not the sort of thing you'd put in a press release.

But again, that's not my focus. I chose the theme "politics and the devil" because it's the title of an essay by the late University of Chicago philosopher Leszek Kolakowski.[1] Some of you may know his work from your studies. Kolakowski was a former Marxist, a very gifted scholar, and a skeptic about many things – but not about the reality of evil or the nature of the devil. One of the disturbing things for Kolakowski's secular colleagues was that he talked about Satan not as a metaphor or legend or the figment of neurotic imaginations, but as a living actor in history. And that deserves some discussion. We'll get to that in a moment, but let's begin at the beginning.


Politics often works like a virus. The simpler a political slogan is, the faster people absorb it; the faster they transmit it; and the less likely they are to really think about it – which means they don't develop an immunity to its content.

Here's an example. A theme we've heard from many of our cultural leaders over the past few years – at least when they're not battling over the economy or health care – goes like this. America needs to return science to its "rightful place" in public life. And of course, who can argue with that? Science does an enormous amount of good. Obviously science should have its rightful place alongside every other important human endeavor. But one thing that this theme often means, in practice, is that we need to spend a lot more money on research. Especially the controversial kind. And while we're at it, we should stop asking so many annoying ethical questions, so that science can get on with its vital work.

So if a citizen fails to bring his moral beliefs into our country's political conversation; if he fails to work for them publicly and energetically; then the only thing he ensures is the defeat of his own beliefs.

I want to focus on those words "rightful place." That's an interesting phrase. A "rightful" place suggests that there's also a wrongful place; a bad alternative. And words like right and wrong, good and bad, are loaded with moral judgment. A "good" law embodies what somebody thinks is right. A "bad" public policy embodies what somebody thinks is bad, or at least inadequate.

All law in some sense teaches and forms us, while also regulating our behavior. The same applies to our public policies, including the ones that govern our scientific research. There's no such thing as morally neutral legislation or morally neutral public policy. Every law is the public expression of what somebody thinks we "ought" to do. The question that matters is this: Which moral convictions of which somebodys are going to shape our country's political and cultural future – including the way we do our science?


The answer is pretty obvious: If you and I as citizens don't do the shaping, then somebody else will. That's the nature of a democracy. A healthy democracy depends on people of conviction working hard to advance their ideas in the public square – respectfully and peacefully, but vigorously and without apologies. Politics always involves the exercise of power in the pursuit of somebody's idea of the common good. And politics always and naturally involves the imposition of somebody's values on the public at large. So if a citizen fails to bring his moral beliefs into our country's political conversation; if he fails to work for them publicly and energetically; then the only thing he ensures is the defeat of his own beliefs.

We also need to remember that most people – not everyone, of course, but most of us – root our moral convictions in our religious beliefs. What we believe about God shapes what we think about the nature of men and women, the structure of good human relationships, and our idea of a just society. This has very practical consequences, including the political kind. We act on what we really believe. If we don't act on our beliefs, then we don't really believe them.

As a result, the idea that the "separation of Church and state" should force us to exclude our religious beliefs from guiding our political behavior makes no sense at all, even superficially. If we don't remain true in our public actions to what we claim to believe in our personal lives, then we only deceive ourselves. Because God certainly isn't fooled. He sees who and what we are. God sees that our duplicity is really a kind of cowardice. And our lack of courage does a lot more damage than simply wounding our own integrity. It also saps the courage of other good people who really do try to publicly witness what they believe. And that compounds a sin of dishonesty with a sin of injustice.

I'd like to dwell on the issue of science for just another moment, because it will lead us into the rest of our discussion tonight. I want you to listen to some thoughts from two very different sources. Here's the first source:

"Science, by itself, cannot establish the ends to which it is put. Science can discover vaccines and cures for diseases, but it can also create infectious agents; it can uncover the physics of semiconductors, but also the physics of the hydrogen bomb. Science [as] science is indifferent to whether data are gathered under rules that scrupulously protect the interest of human research subjects . . . [or by] bending the rules or ignoring them altogether. A number of the Nazi doctors who injected concentration camp victims with infectious agents or tortured prisoners by freezing or burning them to death were in fact legitimate scientists who gathered real data that could potentially be put to good use."

The same source goes on to worry that, today, many of the bioethicists who claim to counsel and guide the moral course of American science "have become nothing more than sophisticated (and sophistic) justifiers of whatever it is the scientific community wants . . . In any discussion of cloning, stem-cell research, gene-line engineering and the like, it is usually the professional bioethicist who can be relied on to take the most permissive position of anyone in the room."[2]

Now listen to the words from my second source:

"What is our contemporary idiocy? What is the enemy within the [human] city? If I had to give it a name, I think I would call it 'technological secularism.' The idiot today is the technological secularist who knows everything . . . about the organization of all the instruments and techniques of power that are available in the contemporary world – and who, at the same time, understands nothing about the nature of man or about the nature of true civilization."[3]

The words from my first source appeared in 2002. They come from the author and scholar Francis Fukuyama. If you know his work, you know that Fukuyama clearly supports the benefits of science and technology. He is not – to my knowledge – a religious believer. And based on his writings, he seems to have little use for Christianity. But he's also not a fool. He sees exactly where our advances in biotechnology could lead us if we don't find an ethical way of guiding them.

The words from my second source were written exactly 50 years ago, in 1961. They come from John Courtney Murray, the great Jesuit priest and Christian scholar. Murray was a thoughtful man, and he chose his language very carefully. He used the word "idiot" in the original Greek sense of the term, which is quite different from its meaning in modern slang.


For the Greeks, the "idiot" was not a mentally deficient man. Rather, he was a man who did not possess a proper public philosophy; or as Murray says, "a man who is not master of the knowledge and skills that underlie the life of a civilized city. The idiot, to the Greek, was just one stage removed from the barbarian. He is the man who is ignorant of the meaning of the word 'civility'."[4]

As I said, these two sources are very different. One was a believer. The other is not. Father Murray died more than four decades ago, long before today's stem-cell and cloning debates. But both men would agree that science and technology are not ends in themselves. They're enormously valuable tools. But they're tools that can undermine human dignity – and even destroy what it means to be "human" – just as easily as they can serve human progress. Everything depends on who uses them, and how. Fools with tools are still fools; and the more powerful the tools, the more dangerous the fools. Or to put it another way, neither science nor technology requires a moral conscience to produce results. The evidence for that fact is the record of the last century.

Now I've talked about these things so far for a simple reason. The moral and political struggle we face today in defending human dignity is becoming more complex. I believe that abortion is the foundational human rights issue of our lifetime. We can't simultaneously serve the poor and accept the legal killing of unborn children. We can't build a just society, and at the same time legally sanctify the destruction of generations of unborn human life. The rights of the poor and the rights of the unborn child flow from exactly the same human dignity guaranteed by the God who created us.

For the Greeks, the "idiot" was not a mentally deficient man. Rather, he was a man who did not possess a proper public philosophy; or as Murray says, "a man who is not master of the knowledge and skills that underlie the life of a civilized city. The idiot, to the Greek, was just one stage removed from the barbarian.

Of course, working to end abortion doesn't absolve us from our obligations to the poor. It doesn't excuse us from our duties to the disabled, the elderly and immigrants. In fact, it demands from us a much stronger commitment to materially support women who find themselves in a difficult pregnancy.

All of these obligations are vital. God will hold us accountable if we ignore them. But none of these other duties can obscure the fact that no human rights are secure if the right to life is not. Unfortunately, abortion is no longer the only major bioethical threat to that right in our culture. In fact, the right to life has never, at any time in the past, faced the range of challenges it faces right now, and will face throughout your lifetimes. Physician-assisted suicide, cloning, brain-computer interface (BCI) research, genetic screening of unwanted fetuses, genetic engineering of preferred physical and intellectual traits, cross-species experimentation and developments in neuroscience – these things already raise serious questions about the definition of "human nature" and the protection of human dignity in the years ahead.


In Europe and the United States, our knowledge classes like to tell us that we live in an age of declining religious belief. But that isn't quite true. A culture that rejects God always invents another, lesser godling to take his place. As a result, in the words of the great Jewish bioethicist Leon Kass, we live in an age of "salvific science." In the place of the God who became man, "we have man become as god." And in place "of a God who – it is said – sent his son who would, through his own suffering, take away the sins of the world, we have a scientific savior who would take away the sin of suffering altogether."

The irony is this: The search for human perfection implied in modern science – or at least, the kind of science accountable to no moral authority outside of itself – leads all too easily to a hatred of imperfection in the real human persons who embody it with their disabilities. The simplest way to deal with imperfections is to eliminate the imperfect. In our daily lives, Kass warns, "the eugenic mentality is taking root, and we are subtly learning with the help of science to believe that there really are certain lives unworthy of being born . . . [T]he most pernicious result of our technological progress . . . [is] the erosion, perhaps the final erosion, of the idea of man as noble, dignified, precious or godlike, and its replacement with a view of man [as] mere raw material for manipulation and homogenization."[5]

Dr. Kass made those remarks at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, itself a monument to the murderous and genuinely satanic misuse of science and politics in the last century. But he wasn't speaking about genocide in the past, in some faraway, alien dictatorship. He was talking about the temptations we face right now, today, in our own democratic societies; the temptations to create "a more perfect human" – and, in the process, to pervert science and attack our own humanity.

This brings us back to politics and the devil, and also to the most important, and final, question of the evening: How do we live as Catholics in the world as it now is?


The great French scholar Jacques Maritain once wrote that "the devil hangs like a vampire on the side of history. History moves forward nonetheless, and [it] moves forward with the vampire."

The great French scholar Jacques Maritain once wrote that "the devil hangs like a vampire on the side of history. History moves forward nonetheless, and [it] moves forward with the vampire."[6] The devil is condemned to work within time. He works in the present to capture our hearts and steal our future. But he also attacks our memory; the narrative of our own identity. And he does it for a very good reason. The way we remember history, conditions how we think and choose today, in our daily lives. That's why one of the first things we need to do if we want to "live as Catholics," is to remember what being "Catholic" really means – and we need to learn that lesson in our identity not from the world; not from the tepid and self-satisfied; and not from the enemies of the Church, even when they claim to be Catholic; but from the mind and memory of the Church herself, who speaks through her pastors.

Jacques Maritain and Leszek Kolakowski came from very different backgrounds. Maritain was deeply Catholic. Kolakowski was in no sense an orthodox religious thinker. But they would have agreed that good and evil, God and the devil, are very real – and that history is the stage where that struggle is played out, both in our personal choices and in our public actions; where human souls choose their sides and create their futures. In Kolakowski's own words, "we are not passive observers or victims of this contest, but participants as well, and therefore our destiny is decided on the field on which we run."[7]

Politics is the exercise of power; and power – as Jesus himself saw when Satan tempted him in the desert – can very easily pervert itself by doing evil in the name of pursuing good ends. But this fact is never an excuse for cowardice or paralysis. Christ never absolved us from defending the weak, or resisting evil in the world, or from solidarity with people who suffer. Our fidelity as Christians is finally to God, but it implies a faithfulness to the needs of God's creation. That means we're involved – intimately – in the life of the world; and that we need to act on what we believe: always with humility, always with charity and always with prudence; but also always with courage. We need to fight for what we believe. As Kolakowski wrote, "Our destiny is decided on the field on which we run."

I want to leave you with two final thoughts.

Here's the first. Nothing we do to defend the human person, no matter how small, is ever unfruitful or forgotten. Our actions touch other lives and move other hearts in ways we can never fully understand in this world.

The great French scholar Jacques Maritain once wrote that "the devil hangs like a vampire on the side of history. History moves forward nonetheless, and [it] moves forward with the vampire.

Don't ever underestimate the beauty and power of the witness you give in your prolife work. You may think I came here tonight to encourage you; and of course that's true – I did. But I also came here for me, to see your dedication and to draw friendship and strength from you. One thing we learn from Scripture is that God doesn't have much use for the vain or the prideful. But He loves the anawim – the ordinary, simple, everyday people who keep God's Word, who stay faithful to his commandments, and who sustain the life of the world by leavening it with their own goodness. That's the work you're called to do, no matter where God leads you after Notre Dame. Don't ever forget it. If you speak up for the unborn child in this life, someone will speak up for you in the next, when we meet God face to face.

Here's my second and final thought. A friend once shared with me the unofficial motto of the Texas Rangers. It goes like this: "No man in the wrong can stand up against a fella that's in the right, and keeps a-comin."[8] I believe that. I believe it because the message is true. Virtue does matter. Courage and humility, justice and perseverance, do have power. Good does win. And the sanctity of human life will endure. It will endure because young men and women like yourselves will remember that if "God so loved the world that He gave his only Son" (Jn 3:16), then the odds look pretty good, and it's worth fighting for what's right.

So let's pray for each other, and support each other, and thank God for the privilege of being together in his service.


Endnotes:

  1. Leszek Kolakowski, "Politics and the Devil,"collected in Modernity on Endless Trial, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1997; pages 175-191; originally published in Encounter, No. 400, 1987
  2. Francis Fukuyama, Our Posthuman Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology Revolution, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, 2002; see pages 185, 204
  3. John Courtney Murray, S.J., "The Return to Tribalism,"1961; available online from the Woodstock Theological Center Library
  4. Ibid.
  5. Leon Kass, M.D., "A more perfect human: the promise and peril of modern science,"a talk delivered at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, March 17, 2005. Dr. Kass, Addie Clark Harding Professor at the University of Chicago and Herzog Fellow in Social Thought at the American Enterprise Institute, is the former chairman of the President's Council on Bioethics.
  6. Jacques Maritain, Integral Humanism, Freedom in the Modern World, and A Letter on Independence, University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, IN, 1996; ed. Otto Bird, trans. Otto Bird, Joseph Evans and Richard O'Sullivan.; page 5
  7. Kolakowski, "Politics and the Devil,"in Modernity on Endless Trial, page 191; but see also his essays "The Idolatry of Politics"and "The Self-Poisoning of the Open Society,"collected in the same volume.
  8. Attributed to Ranger Captain Bill McDonald, c 1900; reference check by the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum, Waco, Texas.

 

 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "Politics and the devil: Living as Catholics in an age of unbelief." University of Notre Dame Right to Life lecture series (April 8, 2011).

Reprinted by permission of The Most Reverend Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.

THE AUTHOR

The Most Reverend Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., has been the archbishop of Denver, Colorado since February 18, 1997. As member of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Tribe, Archbishop Chaput is the second Native American to be ordained bishop in the United States, and the first Native American archbishop. He is the author most recently of Render Unto Caesar: Serving the Nation by Living our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life, and Living the Catholic Faith: Rediscovering the Basics.

Copyright © 2011 Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.




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