To Whom Shall We Go?

ARCHBISHOP TIMOTHY DOLAN

When it comes to the Catholic Church, so goes the popular logic, if something happens to make you angry, always blame the Pope (or the Vatican), or the archbishop (or that darn archdiocese).

Archbishop Timothy Michael Dolan

Every problem in the Church, in this view, whether the decline in Sunday Mass attendance, the closing of a school or parish, or the shortage of vocations, is the fault of the Pope or the archbishop.

That's because the perception is that the Catholic Church is a "top-down" organization – at least according to most newspapers, magazines, and radio/TV news – where decisions are always secretly made way at the top, and the "little guy" is ignored. That's not only true of the secular media. In a recent edition of a prominent Catholic journal, published in New York, I counted six blasts at bishops and the Pope in the first six pages!

Want some recent examples?

A newspaper on Staten Island blames the recent controversy about the proposed sale of an unused convent to an Islamic group on – guess who? – that autocratic, aloof, mean, clandestine archdiocese!

Sorry, editors, but the Archdiocese does not micromanage. I trust our pastors, religious, and lay administrators to run the day-to-day details of our nearly 400 parishes, hundreds of schools, healthcare institutions, and charitable programs.

A decision to sell any parish property initially rests with the pastor of the parish, who should act in close concert with his parish and finance councils and must act in close concert with the parish trustees. In the current case, the pastor concluded after prayerful reflection that the sale would not be in the best interests of his parish and recommended its withdrawal.

But, never mind all this. The editors know better. It's the fault of that mean-old "archdiocese."

You want another example? For years, the pastor and people of St. Michael's Parish have scraped, saved, and sweated to keep their excellent parish high school open. Even though not one student in the school actually lived in the parish, the pastor and people fought to save their school, giving $400,000 annually to keep it going.

Finally, reluctantly, early in the spring, with only thirty new students enrolled for next school-year, the pastor and parishioners sadly decided they were out of money, and couldn't do it anymore. They asked "the archdiocese" to confirm their decision and, after being reassured that every girl could be welcomed at nearby St. Jean Baptiste High School, St. Vincent Ferrer High School, and Cathedral High School, at the same tuition, "the archdiocese" agreed that the good pastor had made the proper, albeit sorrowful, decision.

Who's to blame? The alumnae? The pastor and parish? Those who did not reply to frequent appeals for new students or donations?

Surprise, surprise! The nasty, money-hungry, mean-old "archdiocese" is to blame, according to a source in another, this time, Irish newspaper. See, this source explains, the property of the high school is valuable, so the stingy, money-grabbing, high-handed archdiocese has callously disregarded the kids to get the money.

Had anyone asked, "the archdiocese" would have let him or her know that there were no plans to sell the structure, and that, even if such happened, the money would stay at the parish, not the selfish "archdiocese," according to Church law.

Experts in leadership style tell us that, as a matter of fact, the Catholic Church is probably the best example around of the principle of subsidiarity; namely, that a decision is best made at the level closest to the people who will have to live with the results.

To be sure, there have been, are, and will be instances where controversial decisions are made by "the archdiocese," or by me as archbishop. When that is the case, I'm not about to "pass-the-buck" and blame somebody else.

But, that's not the case in the two tough situations mentioned above.

Who likes criticism? Nobody. But I figure it comes with the job, and have to face it when it's legitimate. That happens often enough.

But I don't like seeing "the archdiocese" blamed for something not its fault.

It's so easy, popular, juicy – and sells papers – to blame the "corrupt Vatican" and "money-hungry archdiocese."

It's just that it's not accurate.

 

 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Archbishop Timothy Michael Dolan. "To Whom Shall We Go?" The Gospel In The Digital Age (June 23, 2010).

Reprinted by permission of the media office of the Archdiocese of New York. The Gospel In The Digital Age is Archbishop Dolan's blog.

THE AUTHOR

Archbishop Timothy Michael Dolan was named Archbishop of New York by Pope Benedict XVI on February 23, 2009. Born February 6, 1950, Archbishop Dolan was ordained to the priesthood on June 19, 1976. He completed his priestly formation at the Pontifical North American College in Rome where he earned a License in Sacred Theology at the Pontifical University of St. Thomas. In 1994, he was appointed rector of the Pontifical North American College in Rome where he served until June 2001. While in Rome, he also served as a visiting professor of Church History at the Pontifical Gregorian University and as a faculty member in the Department of Ecumenical Theology at the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas. The work of the Archbishop in the area of seminary education has influenced the life and ministry of a great number of priests of the new millennium. Archbishop Dolan is the author of Doers of the Word: Putting Your Faith Into Practice, To Whom Shall We Go?, and Advent Reflections: Come, Lord Jesus!.

Copyright © 2010 Archbishop Timothy Michael Dolan




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