Gain healing from troubled waters

BLESSED JOHN HENRY CARDINAL NEWMAN

As years roll on, by little and little one will discover that, after all, he is not, as he imagined, possessed of any real substantial good.

He will begin to find, and be startled at finding, that the things which once pleased, please less and less, or not at all.  He will be unable to recall those lively emotions in which he once indulged; and he will wonder why.

Thus, by degrees, the delightful visions which surrounded him will fade away, and in their stead, melancholy forms will haunt him, such as crowded round the pool of Bethesda … Then a man will begin to be restless and discontented, for he does not know how to amuse himself.  Before, he was cheerful only from the natural flow of his spirits, and when such cheerfulness is lost with increasing years, he becomes evil-natured. He has made no effort to change his heart — to raise, strengthen, and purify his faith — to subdue his bad passions and tempers.  Now their day is come; they have sprung up and begin to domineer …

Gain healing from troubled waters.  Make up your mind to the prospect of sustaining a certain measure of pain and trouble in your passage through life; by the blessing of God this will prepare you for it — it will make you thoughtful and resigned without interfering with your cheerfulness.

 

 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

John Henry Cardinal Newman. "Gain healing from troubled waters." excerpt from Parochial and Plain Sermons (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1997).

THE AUTHOR

Blessed John Henry Newman was born in London, 21 February 1801, and died Birmingham, 11 August 1890. As Vicar of St. Mary's Oxford he exerted a profound spiritual influence on the Church of England. Joining the Catholic Church in 1845 he founded Oratories of St. Philip Neri in Birmingham and London, was the first rector of the Catholic University in Dublin, and was made Cardinal by Pope Leo XIII in 1879. Through his published writings and private correspondence he created a greater understanding of the Catholic Church and its teachings, helping many persons with their religious difficulties. At his death he was praised for his unworldliness, humility, and prayerful contact with the invisible world. He was declared Venerable on 22 January 1991. John Henry Cardinal Newman is the author of many books including, Parochial and Plain Sermons, Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent, Difficulties of Anglicans, The Idea of a University, Fifteen Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford Between A.D. 1826 and 1843, and Apologia Pro Vita Sua.

Copyright © This book is in the public domain




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